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Flux Oersted Cloud Cabaret

Flux Oersted makes electronic music that has been described as a "strange brand of synthpop with rock and industrial overtones." In the beginning, we made cassette tapes that we tried to distribute and give away. At one point, we had a live band featuring some of the members of Rome Georgia's Uno Ya. That's where our music comes from now. Look for our music on iTunes, Amazon.com, bandcamp.com, SoundCloud.com, and at our own websites.

Optional Crowd Noise™ helps to enhance the "Live Music" simulation. Start the crowd, get your food, and then sit back and choose from a variety of selections from our music and video collections.

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Copyright © 2021 Robby Garner
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Some History

Flux Oersted started as a recording project by Robby Garner. Around 1988 we became a band featuring Sam Hancock on keyboards and Tommy Roberson on bass. We've forked a new band called The Phalse Prophets that features Dutch Cartoonist and Zaa Phafalene.

In collaboration with musicians from around the world, we make electronic music we like and we sell our music on iTunes, Amazon.com, and other online stores, but we still also give some of it away on bandcamp.com, SoundCloud.com, and at our own websites. So far, nobody has caught on to the fact that this is a software project as much as anything.

When Sam Hancock and Robby Garner first met, there was a thriving original music scene in Rome Georgia, and some of it was quite good. The Reprehensibles, The Dirt Dobbers, Psychedelic Horse Doctors, Heart of Facts, and many more were around at that time, in that part of the world. So all this music was being written and performed in local venues. It was in the late 1980's so the Internet had not become widely known then. Our collective energies were mainly spent on the performances, as it was more expensive if not impossible to save them, except maybe to a cassette tape recorded off the mix board or something like that. I ran sound for the Reprehensibles, Kada Kada, and the odd fill in for another sound man if they were sick. So what were the odds that Robby Garner would meet Sam Hancock? Thanks to Clay Broome for introducing us.

Sam had a studio in Rome back then called Machine Sounds Studio. He had all these odd furniture that had been cast off from a local hospital, and enough equipment to begin recording 4-track tapes, and making computer sequences that we wrote to control our musical equipment. Our influences were very similar and we had no trouble thinking of new songs to learn or program. But we kept writing our own of course. Our music was in a different vein than that of our friends but it was overall a very supportive environment for the arts. I was in Kada Kada, Uno Ya, and Flux Oersted. I was also in Edgar Allen and the Poe Boys, A Presence Called Fred, and The Dick Names, but let's stick to bands that played more than one time together.

A Presence Called Fred.
   A Presence Called Fred photo by Robert Cambron

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Flux Oersted · CyberMecha
Flux Oersted · Landing Party

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Come to the cabaret!"